Find Phlebotomy Training Near Me in District of Columbia

Why Did You Desire to Be a Phlebotomist in District of Columbia?

District of Columbia phlebotomist holding blood sampleWhen getting ready to interview for a Phlebotomy job in District of Columbia, it’s a good idea to review questions you might be asked. One of the questions that recruiters often ask District of Columbia Phlebotomy prospects is “What drove you to decide on Phlebotomy as a career?”. What the interviewer is hoping to learn is not merely the private reasons you may have for becoming a Phlebotomist, but also what attributes and skills you possess that make you good at your profession. You will likely be asked questions relating primarily to Phlebotomy, along with a certain number of routine interview questions, so you should prepare some strategies about how you would like to answer them. Given that there are numerous variables that go into selecting a career, you can address this primary question in a number of ways. When preparing an answer, try to include the reasons the profession appeals to you along with the talents you possess that make you an outstanding Phlebotomist and the best candidate for the position. Don’t try to memorize a response, but jot down some concepts and talking points that pertain to your own strengths and experiences. Reviewing sample responses can help you to formulate your own thoughts, and give you ideas of what to include to impress the interviewer.

Considering Phlebotomy Training in District of Columbia?

Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.[4] Founded after the American Revolution as the seat of government of the newly independent country, Washington was named after George Washington, first President of the United States and Founding Father.[5] Washington is the principal city of the Washington Metropolitan Area, which has a population of 6,131,977.[6] Washington is described as the political Capital of the World, owing to its status as the seat of the United States Federal Government and numerous international institutions, such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund.[7] Washington is one of the most visited cities in the world, with more than 20 million annual tourists.[8][9]

The signing of the Residence Act on July 16, 1790, approved the creation of a capital district located along the Potomac River on the country's East Coast. The U.S. Constitution provided for a federal district under the exclusive jurisdiction of the Congress and the District is therefore not a part of any state. The states of Maryland and Virginia each donated land to form the federal district, which included the pre-existing settlements of Georgetown and Alexandria. Named in honor of President George Washington, the City of Washington was founded in 1791 to serve as the new national capital. In 1846, Congress returned the land originally ceded by Virginia; in 1871, it created a single municipal government for the remaining portion of the District.

Washington had an estimated population of 693,972 as of July 2017. Commuters from the surrounding Maryland and Virginia suburbs raise the city's population to more than one million during the workweek. The Washington metropolitan area, of which the District is the principal city, has a population of over 6 million, the sixth-largest metropolitan statistical area in the country.

Other Great Cities in District of Columbia

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